Innovate & Challenge Fate

The Ontario Stem Cell Initiative (OSCI) is a virtual network of over 145 stem cell and regenerative medicine research programs across nine centres in Ontario, including stem cell biologists, biomedical engineers and translational clinicians. OSCI provides a direct portal to stem cell activities all over Ontario, informing and engaging research partners, industry, government, funding agencies, and the international scientific community. OSCI's origins began in 2008 with the Toronto Stem Cell Initiative and officially launched as a Provincial initiative on June 14, 2011. OSCI's slogan, Innovate & Challenge Fate, encompasses the work of its scientists who are challenging cell and disease fate through their innovative work.

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Stem Cell News

Oct/20/14
First step: from human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

[EurekAlert]  In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. Read more...

Magnets could be a tool for directing stem cells' healing powers to treat conditions such as heart disease or vascular disease.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp
Magnets could be a tool for directing stem cells' healing powers to treat conditions such as heart disease or vascular disease.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp

By feeding made of iron oxide, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech can use magnets to attract the cells to a particular location in the body after .

The results are published online in the journal Small and will a



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp

By feeding made of iron oxide, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech can use magnets to attract the cells to a particular location in the body after .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp

By feeding made of iron oxide, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech can use magnets to attract the cells to a particular location in the body after .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp

By feeding made of iron oxide, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech can use magnets to attract the cells to a particular location in the body after .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-stem-cells-magnets-proof-concept.html#jCp
Monash University researchers are shedding light on the complex processes that underpin the creation and differentiation of stem cells, bringing closer the promise of 'miracle' therapies.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-route-stem-cell-therapies.html#jCp
Dr Jose Polo of the Australian Institute (ARMI) and the Department of Anatomy and and his team, with collaborators at Harvard, have comprehensively mapped, for the first time, the process by which are re-programmed to become an induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-route-stem-cell-therapies.html#jCp
Dr Jose Polo of the Australian Institute (ARMI) and the Department of Anatomy and and his team, with collaborators at Harvard, have comprehensively mapped, for the first time, the process by which are re-programmed to become an induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-route-stem-cell-therapies.html#jCp
Oct/20/14
OSCI PI improved function in mice following spinal cord injury.

[Stem Cells & Development] OSCI PI, Michael Fehlings (UHN), improved locomotor function in mice after spinal cord injury using embryonic stem cell derived neural stem cell transplantation. Read more...

Dr. Nagy, one of the few scientists to receive this year's prestigious honour, established Canada's first human embryonic stem cell lines and also discovered a new method to create pluripotent stem cells (cells that can develop into most other cell types) without risk of disrupting healthy genes. He and his team have developed a broad spectrum of genomic technologies now used around the world. - See more at: http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/about_us/news/2014-news/pioneering-stem-cell...
Dr. Nagy, one of the few scientists to receive this year's prestigious honour, established Canada's first human embryonic stem cell lines and also discovered a new method to create pluripotent stem cells (cells that can develop into most other cell types) without risk of disrupting healthy genes. He and his team have developed a broad spectrum of genomic technologies now used around the world. - See more at: http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/about_us/news/2014-news/pioneering-stem-cell...
Dr. Andras Nagy, Senior Investigator at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, has been elected to the Royal Society of Canada for his fundamental contributions in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. - See more at: http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/about_us/news/2014-news/pioneering-stem-cell...
Dr. Andras Nagy, Senior Investigator at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, has been elected to the Royal Society of Canada for his fundamental contributions in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. - See more at: http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/about_us/news/2014-news/pioneering-stem-cell...
Dr. Andras Nagy, Senior Investigator at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, has been elected to the Royal Society of Canada for his fundamental contributions in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. - See more at: http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/about_us/news/2014-news/pioneering-stem-cell...
Oct/20/14
Brain cells with Alzheimer's Disease grown in a petri dish.

(Discover] For the first time, neuroscientists from Massachusetts General Hospital have grown functioning human brain cells that develop Alzheimer’s disease in a petri dish. The breakthrough offers researchers a new method to test cures and decipher the origins of the disease. Read more...

Oct/09/14
OSCI Translation Talk: Nov 11 @ 4 with Freda Miller (SickKids) and Donald Mabbott (SickKids)

(OSCI) Join us Tuesday, November 11th for Freda Miller (Senior Scientist, SickKids) and Donald Mabbott (Senior Associate Scientist, SickKids) who will be speaking on "Recruiting neural precursors for brain repair: from genes to cognition." The Translation Talk will take place from 4:00-5:00 pm in the Red Room, 2nd Floor, Donnelly Centre, 160 College St, University of Toronto or via webcast (link will be live at time and date of event). Read more...

 

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